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Monday, May 31, 2010

VOTE Makafui Apeku

Friday, May 28, 2010

MY MANIFESTO

Mr. chairman, SRC, executives, colleagues, ladies and gentlemen. I am highly honored and pleased to stand in front of you here seeking your mandate to become the next AUCC SRC financial secretary. First of all I would like to congratulate miss yvone Appiah Kubby for her hard work but I am more than ready to take the SRC and the entire student to the river side so that we can all drink the water of life in AUCC.

Mr Chairman as I stand here I am saddened because our SRC do not have it own bank account. Just recently our current SRC lost 3.something million just because they were no bank account for them to keep the money in. ladies and gentlemen if I become the financial secretary I will open bank account for the SRC, not any bank account but an account that can yield interest for the SRC and that account will be the savings account.

Mr. chairman kindly permit me to do a little bit of calculations here. Mr. chairman if the entire student population in aucc is about 300 and a student pays 5 cedies as his or her dues per semester then (if we multiply 300x5 cedies) it means management will give us 15million per semester and in a year it will be 30million.Mr. chairman, ladies and gentlemen we all know that within a year SRC has so many activities to organized example is the SRC week, women’s week, sports and so on. it means our 30million dues will not even cover most of our programmes. ladies and gentlemen if I become the financial secretary I will continue to push for the increase of the SRC dues from management an agenda which the current SRC administration has started already.

Mr. chairman as a financial secretary one of my responsibilities is to take care of the SRC finances but if I become the next SRC finanacial secretary I will bring bussines into the SRC. business like selling of AUCC and SRC panaferellia, in every university they all have their books, files, pens,T’shirt and so on which they sell to their student and to anybody who want to buy. The proceeds from this and other business will help subsidize SRC activities and this will enable every student to take part in SRC programmes.

Thursday, May 20, 2010

Relevance of mass comm. theories

Using examples discuss how relevant mass communication theories are to the 3 eras of civilization.

Mass communication began as a story telling age where listeners pass on stories on to new generation. An example of mass communication is radio, news papers, internet, and television.

Agrarian society is a culture or community in which agriculture is the primary means of subsistence; an economy that relies heavily on agricultural production.

An agrarian society is one that is based on agriculture as its prime means for support and sustenance. The society acknowledges other means of livelihood and work habits but stresses on agriculture and farming, and was the main form of socio-economic organization for most of recorded human history.

This was the common way for Medieval European countries to gain wealth. Change in agrarian practices occurred first in England in the 18th century, with the British Agricultural Revolution, and then subsequently later spread to the rest of Europe and the United States.

Only one modern example of a national agrarian experiment exists, the tyrannical efforts of the Khmer Rouge in Cambodia from 1975 to their deposition by Vietnam in 1979. Sub-national agrarian movements include the Amish and Mennonites.

Agriculture or the agrarian is based on manual work and it is not useful to the mass communication theory because by then they live in small families.shanon and we.ver did this for mass communication, but because most of the agrarian community is based on stone age so the Shannon and weaver

Industrialization is the process of social and economic change whereby a human group is transformed from a pre-industrial society into an industrial one. It is a part of a wider modernization process, where social change and economic development are closely related with technological innovation, particularly with the development of large-scale energy and metallurgy production. It is the extensive organization of an economy for the purpose of manufacturing.

Industrialization also introduces a form of philosophical change where people obtain a different attitude towards their perception of nature, and a sociological process of ubiquitous rationalization.

There is considerable literature on the factors facilitating industrial modernization and enterprise development. Key positive factors identified by researchers have ranged from favorable political-legal environments for industry and commerce, through abundant natural resources of various kinds, to plentiful supplies of relatively low-cost, skilled and adaptable labour.

One survey of countries in Africa, Asia, the Middle East, and Latin America and the Caribbean in the late 20th century found that high levels of structural differentiation, functional specialisation, and autonomy of economic systems from government were likely to contribute greatly to industrial-commercial growth and prosperity. Amongst other things, relatively open trading systems with zero or low duties on goods imports tended to stimulate industrial cost-efficiency and innovation across the board. Free and flexible labour and other markets also helped raise general business-economic performance levels, as did rapid popular learning capabilities.

Positive work ethics in populations at large combined with skills in quickly utilising new technologies and scientific discoveries were likely to boost production and income levels – and as the latter rose, markets for consumer goods and services of all kinds tended to expand and provide a further stimulus to industrial investment and economic growth. By the end of the century, East Asia was one of the most economically successful regions of the world – with free market countries such as Hong Kong being widely seen as models for other, less developed countries around the world to emulate.[4] The first country to industrialize was Great Britain during the Industrial Revolution

According to the original sector classification of Jean Fourastié, an economy consists of a "Primary sector" of commodity production (farming, livestock breeding, exploitation of mineral resources), a "secondary sector" of manufacturing and processing, and a "Tertiary Sector" of service industries. The industrialisation process is historically based on the expansion of the secondary sector in an economy dominated by primary activities.

The first ever transformation to an industrial economy from an agrarian one was called the Industrial Revolution and this took place in the late 18th and early 19th centuries in a few countries of Western Europe and North America, beginning in Great Britain. This was the first industrialization in the world's history.

The Second Industrial Revolution describes a later, somewhat less dramatic change which came about in the late 19th century with the widespread availability of electric power, internal combustion engines, and assembly lines to the already industrialized nations.

The lack of an industrial sector in a country is widely seen as a major handicap in improving a country's economy, and power, pushing many governments to encourage or enforce industrialization.

According to the original sector classification of Jean Fourastié, an economy consists of a "Primary sector" of commodity production (farming, livestock breeding, exploitation of mineral resources), a "secondary sector" of manufacturing and processing, and a "Tertiary Sector" of service industries. The industrialization process is historically based on the expansion of the secondary sector in an economy dominated by primary activities.

The first ever transformation to an industrial economy from an agrarian one was called the Industrial Revolution and this took place in the late 18th and early 19th centuries in a few countries of Western Europe and North America, beginning in Great Britain. This was the first industrialization in the world's history.

The Second Industrial Revolution describes a later, somewhat less dramatic change which came about in the late 19th century with the widespread availability of electric power, internal combustion engines, and assembly lines to the already industrialized nations.

The lack of an industrial sector in a country is widely seen as a major handicap in improving a country's economy, and power, pushing many governments to encourage or enforce industrialization.

After the Convention of Kanagawa, which was issued by Commodore Matthew C. Perry, had forced Japan to open the ports of Shimoda and Hakodate to American trade, the Japanese government realized that drastic reforms were necessary in order to stave off Western influence. The Tokugawa shogunate abolished the feudal system. The government instituted military reforms to modernize the Japanese army and also constructed the base for industrialization. In the 1870s, the Meiji government vigorously promoted technological and industrial development which eventually brought Japan to become a powerful modern country.

In a similar way, Russia suffered during the Allied intervention in the Russian Civil War. The Soviet Union's centrally controlled economy decided to invest a big part of its resources to enhance its industrial production and infrastructures in order to assure its own survival, thus becoming a world superpower.

During the cold war, the other European socialist countries, organized under the Comecon framework, followed the same developing scheme, albeit with a less emphasis on heavy industry.

Southern European countries saw a moderate industrialization during the 1950s-1990s, caused by a healthy integration of the European economy, though their level of development, as well as those of eastern countries, doesn't match the western

In recent decades, a few countries in Latin America, Asia, and Africa, such as Turkey, South Africa, Malaysia, Philippines and Mexico have experienced substantial industrial growth, fuelled by exportations going to countries that have bigger economies: the United States, Japan, China, and the EU. They are sometimes called newly-industrialized countries.[citation needed]

Despite this trend being artificially influenced by the oil price increases since 2003, the phenomenon is not entirely new nor totally speculative (for instance see: Maquiladora). Most analysts conclude in the next few decades the whole world will experience industrialisation, and international inequality will be replaced with worldwide social inequality

Information as a concept has many meanings, from everyday usage to technical settings. The concept of information is closely related to notions of constraint, communication, control, data, form, instruction, knowledge, meaning, mental stimulus, pattern, perception, and representation. In its most restricted technical meaning, information is an ordered sequence of symbols.

The English word was apparently derived from the Latin accusative form (informationem) of the nominative (information): this noun is in its turn derived from the verb "informare" (to inform) in the sense of "to give form to the mind", "to discipline", "instruct", "teach": "Men so wise should go and inform their kings." (1330) Inform itself comes (via French) from the Latin verb informare, to give form to, to form an idea of. Furthermore, Latin itself already contained the word information meaning concept or idea, but the extent to which this may have influenced the development of the word information in English is unclear.

As a final note, the ancient Greek word for form was "μορφή" (morf -> morphe, Morph) and also είδος eidos (kind, idea, shape, set), the latter word was famously used in a technical philosophical sense by Plato (and later Aristotle) to denote the ideal identity or essence of something (see Theory of forms). "Eidos" can also be associated with thought, proposition or even concept.

Information is a term with many meanings depending on context, but is as a rule closely related to such concepts as meaning, knowledge, instruction, communication, representation, and mental stimulus. Simply stated, information is a message received and understood. In terms of data, it can be defined as a collection of facts from which conclusions may be drawn. There are many other aspects of information since it is the knowledge acquired through study or experience or instruction. But overall, information is the result of processing, manipulating and organizing data in a way that adds to the knowledge of the person receiving it.

Information is the state of a system of interest. Message is the information materialized.

Information is a quality of a message from a sender to one or more receivers. Information is always about something (size of a parameter, occurrence of an event, value, ethics, etc). Viewed in this manner, information does not have to be accurate; it may be a truth or a lie, or just the sound of a falling tree. Even a disruptive noise used to inhibit the flow of communication and create misunderstanding would in this view be a form of information. However, generally speaking, if the amount of information in the received message increases, the message is more accurate.

This model assumes there is a definite sender and at least one receiver. Many refinements of the model assume the existence of a common language understood by the sender and at least one of the receivers. An important variation identifies information as that which would be communicated by a message if it were sent from a sender to a receiver capable of understanding the message. In another variation, it is not required that the sender be capable of understanding the message, or even cognizant that there is a message, making information something that can be extracted from an environment, e.g., through observation, reading or measurement.

Communication theory provides a numerical measure of the uncertainty of an outcome. For example, we can say that "the signal contained thousands of bits of information". Communication theory tends to use the concept of information entropy, generally attributed to Claude Shannon, see below.

Another form of information is Fisher information, a concept of R.A. Fisher. This is used in application of statistics to estimation theory and to science in general. Fisher information is thought of as the amount of information that a message carries about an unobservable parameter. It can be computed from knowledge of the likelihood function defining the system. For example, with a normal likelihood function, the Fisher information is the reciprocal of the variance of the law. In the absence of knowledge of the likelihood law, the Fisher information may be computed from normally distributed score data as the reciprocal of their second moment.

Even though information and data are often used interchangeably, they are actually very different. Data are sets of unrelated information, and as such are of no use until they are properly evaluated. Upon evaluation, once there is some significant relation between data, and they show some relevance, then they are converted into information. Now this same data can be used for different purposes. Thus, till the data convey some information, they are not useful and therefore not information.

Relevance of mass communication in an information age. The mass or the people are able to access information at a faster rate, this is because the Shannon and weaver theory is useful here. They use technologies like telephone, television, radio, news papers in the spread of information at a faster rate than the early stage of life. Mass communication also help the masses in high accelerated development because of the easy access to information. Credibility and accuracy is also another relevance in mass communication because is not all the information which are lost, and in mass communication they make sure that they give accurate information.

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FACEAIDS DONATES

FACEAIDS DONATES

Face AIDS, a student campaign to fight HIV/AIDS in Ghana on Tuesday, 1st December, 2009 donated food items and a cash amount to People Living with HIV/AIDS at the Tetteh Quarshie Memorial Hospital.

The student group is a chapter based at African University College of Communication. In a short speech by the chapter President, Mr. Dennis Moot assured the patients not to worry nor develop some kind of fear since all hopes are not lost. He also pleaded with the Hospital Authority to make room for vocational training for people living HIV/AIDS which will be a source of income for them.

This will go a long way, to reduce the rate at which infected persons feel dejected and always expecting help from benevolent individuals, organization and corporate entities.

The Deputy Director of Nurses, Madam Mary Nartey, has thanked the chapter on behalf of the hospital and promised to make good use of the items presented. She also used this opportunity to plead to other philanthropist to give a helping hand.

Members of the club partake in the celebration of the World Aids Day grand durbar at Jacksons Park, Koforidua, organized by the National AIDS Commission.